interiordesign

Back to School Home Organization Tips

Think Outside the Classroom

Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rubbermaid/5093615082/

Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rubbermaid/5093615082/

September is here, and the new school year is officially in full swing. Kids are getting used to new teachers and classrooms. Morning routines are in place. Bedtimes are set. Now, you have a little bit of time to think about something else to make your schedule run even more smoothly: organizing your home.

During this busy time of year, stuff has a way of getting piled up. It starts with a pair of soccer cleats thrown over here, then a backpack slung over there. Before you know it, everything you own is scattered throughout the house. Nothing has a place of its own.

It may not seem like a big deal at first. Over time, however, this can lead to ongoing stress. Our environments are frequently blended into the background of our lives without so much as a thought. What we don’t realize is that they are of infinite importance to our well-being.

It starts with the structure of the home. Floor plans, lighting and finishes all make an impact on us. It then goes to the furnishings chosen for the home. Sofas, table and their layouts make a difference in how we live. The final layer? Organization of items within the home—our focus today.

5 Essential Home Organization Tips:

Give Everything a Home

Containers and baskets and shelves, oh my! Group your stuff into categories first. Put all those scrunchies into a pile. Arrange those books into neat stacks. Gather up all those loose toys. Once they’re all grouped, you’ll be able to tell how many storage containers you need. Stock up and get those items stashed away. When everything has a place to belong, picking up is way simpler.

Photo: https://www.needpix.com/photo/591447/shelf-container-rack-food-shelves-store-people-market-industry

Photo: https://www.needpix.com/photo/591447/shelf-container-rack-food-shelves-store-people-market-industry

Break Cleaning into Small, Daily Tasks

Instead of letting chores build until it seems like an insurmountable task to get the house clean, break everything up into small, daily tasks. For example, you could make your task of the day be vacuuming. Tomorrow, it could be cleaning the bathroom mirrors. What was once an overwhelming undertaking now seems manageable. It’s also a great way to get kids involved, who can get in the habit of doing one small chore a day.

Make it a Game

Speaking of getting the kids involved, a great way to do this is to make it a game. Make it a race to see who can get their toys picked up the fastest. See how many days in a row they can go without forgetting to take out the trash. Another idea is to create a reward system.

Plan Ahead

Oftentimes, a little planning is the key to keeping your home organized. Schedule cleaning times. Get in the routine of cleaning every day at a certain time. Routines are especially helpful in the morning. Lay out outfits and pack lunches the night before. This prevents the closets and kitchens from turning into madhouses in the morning rush. In the mornings, there often isn’t time to put things back, so the mess builds. A little planning will take care of the problem.

Deep Clean Every Six Months

While small, daily tasks work for most chores, there are some things that don’t need to be done as often. You can save these things for a deep clean about twice a year. This is also a great time to get rid of any clutter that has built up in the past months. Sift through what you haven’t touched in the past six months, and donate it.

Photo: https://www.pexels.com/photo/flat-lay-photography-of-calendar-1020323/

Photo: https://www.pexels.com/photo/flat-lay-photography-of-calendar-1020323/

These incredibly simple tips can get your home in tip-top shape. Mornings will be a breeze, and evenings will be more enjoyable. What are you waiting for? Get organizing. It’s not as hard as you think.


Michaela Satterfield

James Décor Writer

The Dog Days of Summer

Cool Color Inspiration to Help You Beat the Heat

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It’s the time of year when even a quick swim or run through the sprinkler isn’t enough to make the sticky heat enjoyable. The crisp days of fall seem just within reach, yet aren’t close enough to touch. Hot and humid air is here to stay, at least for a little bit longer.

That’s why we’ve rounded up some inspiration from our showroom to cool things down. Cool colors like blue, green and purple bathe a space in refreshing calmness. Mix the shades in with your warm and neutral colors, or even let them stand on their own. Use them anywhere—accents, artwork, linens and furniture.

Feel the breeze yet? The dog days of summer just got a little less humid.

Michaela Satterfield

James Décor Writer

Photos: Michaela Satterfield

Interior Design Around the World

Japan

Photo: https://pixabay.com/photos/apartment-view-interior-room-3564955/

Photo: https://pixabay.com/photos/apartment-view-interior-room-3564955/

One of the best ways to step out of your style comfort zone is to try an interior design style from another country. There is an endless world of design possibility out there. Most of these design styles have trickled to the United States in one way or another, but their uniqueness is still not as well known. 

The Japanese interior design style is one that would suit those who enjoy clean, modern spaces. Minimalists feel at home in spaces like these. The Japanese style puts more emphasis on space than it does on the things filling a space. This is the opposite of most European styles, which are known for specific accents or types of furniture. Japanese principles include balance, order and natural beauty. 

What else? Read on to discover more attributes of Japanese interior design.

Layout

Japanese interiors emphasize open space. Don’t make things crowded; use as little furniture as possible. Many Japanese spaces don’t even use interior walls to split things up--they opt for movable screens instead. This keeps the entire space open.

Photo: https://pixabay.com/photos/asia-live-living-room-japanese-4209448/

Photo: https://pixabay.com/photos/asia-live-living-room-japanese-4209448/

Textures 

Much of Japanese design is based off of nature. The goal of a Japanese interior is to become one with nature. This means many textures used in Japanese spaces are those that can be found in nature. One specific example is wood, which is used abundantly in Japanese homes. Find it on floors, frames and doors. 

Accents

As with everything else, keep the accessories minimal. Japanese spaces are as uncluttered as possible. Use plants, like bamboo or bonsai, to spruce things up.

Photo: https://pixabay.com/photos/bamboo-forest-green-plant-wood-20936/

Photo: https://pixabay.com/photos/bamboo-forest-green-plant-wood-20936/

Color

Colors, like other aspects of Japanese design, are also based off of nature. Soft blues and greens, along with neutrals, work well. Make sure colors are muted, as the goal of a Japanese space is to be relaxing and blend in with nature. 

Deck out your whole home with the Japanese design style, or simply incorporate a few of the design principles for a calmer, more relaxing space.

Michaela Satterfield

James Décor Writer

Sources:

https://www.impressiveinteriordesign.com/japanese-interior-design-the-concept-and-decorating-ideas/

http://www.home-designing.com/2012/12/japanese-style-minimalist-inspiration

The Best of Both Worlds

Transitional Interior Design

Photo: Michaela Satterfield

Photo: Michaela Satterfield

If there is one style that James Décor is known by, it would be transitional interior design. A mix of traditional and contemporary pieces, seamlessly brought together in the same space, is the trademark of this timeless style. While many are deeply divided between traditional and contemporary styles, those who can’t decide will be happy to know there is a middle ground. With the transitional style, you can truly have your cake and eat it too.

It’s important to note that transitional design is different than eclectic design. Eclectic design is more scattered, combining things that typically wouldn’t go together. Transitional design is intended to be cohesive.

The key to pulling off transitional design is making sure the two styles are mixed together well. You don’t want there to be too many pieces of either style—balance is essential. Typical color palettes are neutral. Nothing should stand out, because it should all work smoothly together. The style veers on the side of minimalism, but isn’t too cold and stark like some modern spaces. You won’t want to overdo it with the accessories. The ones you choose should be tasteful and well-planned. Large pieces of artwork are common.

To see what the transitional style is all about, take a stroll through our showroom. Our interior designers are experts on the style.

Out with the old and in with the new? Neither. You can keep both.

Michaela Satterfield

James Décor Writer


Sources:

https://freshome.com/transitional-design/

https://www.housebeautiful.com/design-inspiration/a24895237/what-is-transitional-design/

Behind the Scenes

An Inside Look at James Décor with Owner Lee Haik

Photo: Michaela Satterfield

Photo: Michaela Satterfield

Sitting behind a desk covered in samples and papers from current projects, Lee Haik proudly reminisces on how she came to be the owner of James Décor, Springfield’s first interior design firm.

After obtaining a degree in home economics at what is now Pittsburgh State University, where she took design classes, Lee says she spent some time with her daughters Martie and Jacque as a stay-at-home mom before purchasing the business. In 1982, Lee and her husband John took over James Décor.

The store was originally opened in 1946. Wallpaper and paint were two of its mainstays, and Lee says she enjoyed matching colors. The original plan was to work part time as an interior designer, but Lee says running the business quickly became a full-time endeavor.

When the Haiks decided to move the business to its current location on Republic Road, Lee says they stopped selling paint and turned James Décor into a full furniture store and interior design firm.

Opening the John-Richard showroom in 2010 was a highlight for the business.

“That was probably one of the smartest moves we made,” Lee says, “because it gave us something to get excited about and people in town were excited about it.”

The line is a favorite among designers and clients, known for carrying unique furniture. Lee says the pieces are designed to work together.

“It’s still one of our best lines,” she says.

Lee says two of her other favorite lines are Marge Carson and Century, but she likes every line the business carries.

Two of James Décor’s goals are to offer a variety of price points and to offer both traditional and contemporary styles, Lee says. This style is called transitional—Lee’s personal favorite.

The variety the showroom displays carries into other aspects of the business.

Although Lee says residential design is her specialty, James Décor has ventured into other types of projects as well. Among the projects tackled are doctors’ offices, law offices and even a dairy.

“I really love what I do,” says Lee Haik, owner of James Décor.

“I really love what I do,” says Lee Haik, owner of James Décor.

“I really get bored if I do the same thing over and over,” Lee says. “I really like the mix. I like to change. Each individual project is so different and the way people live has to dictate the way we design.”

One of the trademarks of design at James Décor is that it’s centered around the people.

Lee remarks that some of her current clients have been working with her since she took over the business in 1982. She is even working with the children and grandchildren of some of her first clients.  

“You can be the best designer in the world but if you don’t have customer service and you don’t care about the people you’re working with, it doesn’t matter,” Lee says.

Relationships are what gave the business success in its early years, and they promise to keep the business running long into the future.

The business is family-owned and Lee says she hopes her daughters will eventually take over, with the help of a team of designers currently working at James Décor.

“I have a staff of young designers that are very talented,” Lee says.

Aside from a dedication to clients and other people involved with the business, the heart behind it all is a love for interior design.

“I really love what I do,” Lee says.


Michaela Satterfield

James Décor Writer



Shop the Look

How to Pull off This Timeless Black & Gold Space

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This vignette is modern with a glamorous Old Hollywood twist. Timeless black mixes with gold to add some shine. Crystal accents, like the lamp stands and accessories displayed on the shelves, add texture to the otherwise sleek look. Simple shelves add a place to display whatever you want without overpowering the décor itself. Black leather recliners create a sophisticated space inviting you to rest in style. The little details pull it all together, like the upholstery tacks in the chairs and gold frame on the artwork. The glossy, agate patterned cabinet steals the show and creates a focal point. This space is certainly one you’ll want to recreate. Here’s how.

Shop the Look:

Cabinet

“I Dream of Agate Four-Door Cabinet” from John-Richard. 34”H x 72”W x 18”D. Glass top.

Lamps

Kate Spade “Castle Peak Table Lamp” from Visual Comfort. Lamp height: 38”. Linen shade.

IMG_1264.jpg

Recliners

“Black Leather Recliner” from Century Furniture. 47”H x 31.50”W x 35.25”D. Black aniline leather.

Shelves

“Modernist Étagère” shelf from John-Richard. 82”H x 18”W x 18”D. Antique brass cubes with glass shelving.

On the Shelves

“Black Box with a Silver Stone” from John-Richard. 5”H x 12”W x 7”D.

“Selenite Sprite” sculpture from John-Richard. Various sizes.

“Celestite Hoop” from John-Richard. Various sizes. Oval hoop with celestite crystal.

Stop by our showroom, where our designers will be happy to show you exactly how to take this look home.

Michaela Satterfield

James Décor Writer

Photos: Michaela Satterfield

Spanish Colonial Interior Design

How to Incorporate This Style in Your Home

Photo: https://pixabay.com/photos/architecture-houses-homes-2608240/

Photo: https://pixabay.com/photos/architecture-houses-homes-2608240/

The Spanish Colonial interior design style is influenced by a rich past. Dark woods, intricate details and plenty of stone give this style depth. It was originally brought to America by the Spanish from the 1600s to 1800s. Popular in California, you may find this style featured in the homes of movie stars. Interested in bringing this timeless style to your home?

5 Trademarks of Spanish Colonial Interior Design:

Stucco Walls

Stucco walls, in white or cream, are popular in Spanish Colonial homes. Other popular choices include adobe brick or stone. These materials were traditionally chosen in order to keep Spanish homes cool. The light walls help break up the other dark features which are popular in this style.

Photo: A typical Spanish Colonial house, featuring stucco walls and a terracotta roof. https://www.flickr.com/photos/29050464@N06/37339136751

Photo: A typical Spanish Colonial house, featuring stucco walls and a terracotta roof. https://www.flickr.com/photos/29050464@N06/37339136751

Wrought Iron

This can be incorporated into interiors in a variety of ways. Wrought iron chandeliers and railings are two examples. Wrought iron is reminiscent of years past, when blacksmiths were found in every town.

Dark Wood

Dark varieties of wood, such as walnut or mahogany, are often featured in Spanish Colonial homes. You’ll find dark wood floors, ceiling beams and fireplace mantels.

Photo: Dark wood cabinetry. https://pixabay.com/photos/home-kitchen-modern-luxury-kitchen-1416381/

Photo: Dark wood cabinetry. https://pixabay.com/photos/home-kitchen-modern-luxury-kitchen-1416381/

Arches

Arches are common architectural features of Spanish Colonial houses. You’ll find them over doorways or windows, in hallways or alcoves. Arches are a simple way to add architectural interest to an otherwise plain space, without going over the top.

Bright, Patterned Fabrics

While the Spanish Colonial style is centered around neutrals such as those found on the wood or tile essential to this style, you’ll also find pops of color and pattern. Colors are bright and patterns are detailed. These can help to break up the other neutrals.

Photo: A Spanish Colonial living room. https://www.flickr.com/photos/137891532@N07/24592028513

Photo: A Spanish Colonial living room. https://www.flickr.com/photos/137891532@N07/24592028513

New Beginnings

Essentials for New Homes

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This time of year is a time of new beginnings. It’s the end of the school year. Summer is almost here. Freedom is calling.

There is one group of people particularly excited about this time of new beginnings: the graduates.

High school graduates will be getting ready to set up their first dorms or apartments. College graduates will be getting ready to move to new apartments or even their first houses. New homes call for new furniture and accessories.

It can be tempting to buy the cheapest stuff you can find to save money initially. This may seem like a good option at first, but you’ll usually get what you pay for. In the long run, you’ll lose money when you have to quickly replace those items.

Why not make an investment to start with? Long-lasting quality is worth the extra money. The difference will be noticeable, too. Quality is in the details.

10 essentials available at James Décor for your new home:

Your sofa won’t be complete without a cozy throw.

Your sofa won’t be complete without a cozy throw.

Our bedding from Sferra is perfect to set up your new bed. You’ll be sleeping like royalty.

Our bedding from Sferra is perfect to set up your new bed. You’ll be sleeping like royalty.

Don’t forget the pillow. Sferra offers those too.

Don’t forget the pillow. Sferra offers those too.

Quality bath towels are a must.

Quality bath towels are a must.

Your bathroom won’t be complete without one of these bath mats from Matouk.

Your bathroom won’t be complete without one of these bath mats from Matouk.

Washcloths are a fun way to add a pop of color.

Washcloths are a fun way to add a pop of color.

Don’t forget the throw pillows. These are an easy way to customize your décor. We have them available in all different styles.

Don’t forget the throw pillows. These are an easy way to customize your décor. We have them available in all different styles.

An area rug is also a great way to customize your décor and add some texture.

An area rug is also a great way to customize your décor and add some texture.

You’ll want to make sure you have plenty of picture frames to keep your family and friends in sight.

You’ll want to make sure you have plenty of picture frames to keep your family and friends in sight.

These geode bookends are a trendy way to keep things organized.

These geode bookends are a trendy way to keep things organized.

Michaela Satterfield

James Décor Writer

Photos: Michaela Satterfield


Interior Design vs. Interior Decorating

The Art and the Science of Interior Design

Photo: Michaela Satterfield

Photo: Michaela Satterfield

There is much confusion surrounding the field of interior design. Many wonder if it is a valid field, thinking there is little skill required in choosing sofa fabrics and drapery colors. Some believe you just have to have a “knack” for it — designing spaces requires little more than some extra creativity.

What many don’t realize, however, is that interior design is not just an art. There is a science to it.

While there are many similarities between interior decorators and interior designers, the fundamental difference is in education.

Interior decorators work to help clients choose décor for their homes. There is no doubt that this requires plenty of interpersonal skill and creativity. Decorators have a natural talent for deciding which things would work together. They are experts on finishes, accessories and furniture.

Interior designers, on the other hand, have obtained a formal degree in interior design, whether that be a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts in interior design. The big concepts of interior design — like sustainability, universal design and an understanding of the construction of a building — are what interior designers may understand better than interior decorators.

Designers look beyond the surface of each building they design. They understand how homes and buildings work on a structural level. They work with architects and contractors to design the building from the blueprints to the finished product, keeping in mind important things like building codes and space planning.

The choice of hiring a designer or a decorator, then, depends on what kind of work you need done. If the work is primarily aesthetic, either a decorator or designer can get the job done. If there are more structural changes needed, a designer will have the education to get that done as well.

Michaela Satterfield

James Décor Writer

Sources:

https://newschoolarch.edu/academics/school-of-design/bachelor-of-interior-design/interior-designer-and-decorator/

https://www.thespruce.com/interior-design-vs-interior-decorating-1976740

Scandinavian Interior Design

The Cozy Minimalist Style

Photo: https://www.maxpixel.net/Home-Nordic-Household-2394831

Photo: https://www.maxpixel.net/Home-Nordic-Household-2394831

Like a light summer breeze, the Scandinavian interior design style is airy and soothing. The blank spaces are as intentional as the décor itself. Brought about by years of tradition, this style pulls off timeless and modern in the same breath.

This style originated in the Nordic region, which is notorious for long, dark winters. The goal of these interiors is to keep things bright and open, but cozy at the same time. This is no easy feat.

Originating in an environment where natural light is in short supply, the way light is used in these spaces is very important. Lots of windows with sheer coverings are popular.

Photo: https://pixabay.com/photos/stay-scandinavian-style-white-room-2132344/

Photo: https://pixabay.com/photos/stay-scandinavian-style-white-room-2132344/

Other minimalist styles are typically cold and uninviting. The Scandinavian style uses lots of textures — like blankets, rugs and throws — to soften the stark white that is a trademark of this style. Stark contrast, like black and white, is one aspect this style uses.

Another big difference between Scandinavian design and other modern styles is the use of color. While neutrals are an essential component, bursts of other colors are used as well. These colors are typically softer, like pastels.

The style is tidy and doesn’t have a lot of ornate detail. The details, however, are intentional. A well placed piece of artwork or pop of texture prevents the clean style from looking too cold.

Photo: https://www.pexels.com/photo/round-black-framed-mirror-on-the-wall-905198/

Photo: https://www.pexels.com/photo/round-black-framed-mirror-on-the-wall-905198/

Minimalist furniture is often used, such as Mid-century modern pieces. These pieces are slim and light, rather than bulky.

You won’t find wall-to-wall carpet in these interiors. Wood floors with plenty of rugs are the norm. Wood is typically light — like beech, ash and pine.

Nature themes are also common. You’ll find botanical artwork, plants and tree branches throughout Scandinavian spaces.

Like a refreshing summer breeze in the middle of winter, the Scandinavian style is a sure way to bring a refreshing yet cozy touch to your space.

Michaela Satterfield

James Décor Writer

Sources:

https://www.mydomaine.com/scandinavian-interior-design-ideas

http://www.contemporist.com/10-common-features-of-scandinavian-interior-design/